All posts tagged: event

Museum Saturday Science meets Art – Co-creating Craft and Art

The exhibition ‘Science meets Art’ illustrates how art can be used as a way to address stigmatisation regarding mental illness and neurodegeneration-related illnesses. It comprises of images of cell structures, fluorescence images, artworks and crafts. This presents a unique opportunity to harness science micrographs in cross-talk, thereby enhancing science by communicating in a unique and powerful manner. Read more on the exhibition here.

Join us for an introduction by project curator – Elizabeth Miller-Vermeulen as she introduces the work of two artists, Nomsa and Zach Mukwira, featured on exhibition. The introduction will be followed by a live demonstration by the Mukwira pair as they introduce and lead you through their practice. View their techniques and creations first hand as you are invited to join in this demonstration from home.

Due to covid-19 regulations the capacity to join the artists at the museum is limited, however there is a limited number of seats available. Book your seat now, or join from the comfort of your own home and be part of this co-creation.

Subscribe to our Youtube channel to watch the demonstration live this Saturday! We would love to see your creations, don’t forget to post online and tag @rupertmuseum #rupertmuseum #sciencemeetsart

Nomsa will be demonstrating making a glass beaded bowl, but, for the people present, she will assist in the making of glass bead coasters/small circular beaded objects.

YOU WILL NEED:

Assorted seed beads (size 6)

Wire bowl frame (available at China Town / Pronto in Salt River / Crafters Inn – Somerset West)

Wire: 0.9mm and 0.5mm

Pliers

Wire cutter


Zach will be doing/making a reinterpretation of his work on the exhibition – he will be using and demonstrating his own/unique “Woven Line” technique.

YOU WILL NEED:

Online:

Velcote board (350g) A1 (use cutting blade to cut to working size, preferred format)

Dala oil paint tubes,50ml, following colours

Yellow ochre, Cardamom yellow, Sky blue, Red, Burnt sienna, Payens grey and White

Brushes   Size 4, 6, 8, 12

Linseed oil (100ml)

Small etching tools

Zenith trimming blades, snap off – 20mm (10)

Pencil 6B

Alkyd oil painting medium

Zelcraft wood glue (100ml)

Turpentine to clean brushes

Museum Saturday Science meets Art – Co-creating Craft and Art
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Bookbinding Workshop

Basic Bookbinding & Book Repairs.

“Your First Steps in Bookbinding”
Learn how to give your worn books a new lease on life at the BOOKBINDING WORKSHOP.

Two Day workshop 30 & 31 January 2021. This workshop is part of our first Museum Saturday of the year!

Each day starts at 10H00 – 16H00.

Price: R875

Bookbinding Workshop
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Museum Saturday A Still from Life – inks, cakes and teas workshop

Join artist Zayaan Khan for a tea time extravaganza in the third installment of her workshops at the Rupert Museum. We will be drinking indigenous teas, while learning about each plant (inclusive of propagated takeaways). Using edible inks of everyday, as well as not the usual foodstuffs – you will be creating delicious still lifes as you decorate your own tea time treats.

Attendance is free, all materials will be provided. Booking is essential. Limited seats available. Please make sure you make a separate booking for each person.

Museum Saturday A Still from Life – inks, cakes and teas workshop
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Museum Saturday GYOTAKU “FISH RUBBINGS” Adults Workshop

This workshop is fully booked, please email denise@rupertmuseum.org to be on the waiting list. 

Hundreds of years ago Japanese fishermen wanted some proof to take home of the size of the fish that they’d caught. They fished carp for sport, not for eating, so they released the fishes that they’d caught back into the water.

Some started to place the rice paper from their sandwiches over the fish and gently rub an imprint of the wet fish onto the paper. At least it showed the head and tail, so an idea of size was possible. Then they started to add some stain or mud or harmless watercolour to their water. Some beautiful fish rubbings started materialising and soon it became an art form. Today Gyotaku is still practiced as art. Just Google it and see the weird and wonderful rubbings that people make.

Of course we won’t use live fish, but we’ll be using frozen fish bought from a fishmonger. Any fish is possible to print, but those with scales and rugged fins print better.

It’s acceptable to add the eye afterwards, as the eye tends to become a black blob when rubbed. It’s also acceptable to add some hand colouring afterwards. There are no strict rules. You’re going to start with the basics of the tradition, but then progress to experiment and to add your own flair to your artworks.

Each attendee will be able to print at least two works.

What to bring? Please bring OLD CLOTHES; you WILL get dirty! The fish and the rest will be supplied.

Also bring your best smile and sense of adventure. This is going to be unforgettable.

Limited seats available, book now. Please make sure you make a separate booking for each person.

Museum Saturday GYOTAKU “FISH RUBBINGS” Adults Workshop
read more

Museum Saturday GYOTAKU “FISH RUBBINGS” Kids Workshop

This workshop is fully booked, please email denise@rupertmuseum.org to be on the waiting list. 

Hundreds of years ago Japanese fishermen wanted some proof to take home of the size of the fish that they’d caught. They fished carp for sport, not for eating, so they released the fishes that they’d caught back into the water.

Some started to place the rice paper from their sandwiches over the fish and gently rub an imprint of the wet fish onto the paper. At least it showed the head and tail, so an idea of size was possible. Then they started to add some stain or mud or harmless watercolour to their water. Some beautiful fish rubbings started materialising and soon it became an art form. Today Gyotaku is still practiced as art. Just Google it and see the weird and wonderful rubbings that people make.

Of course we won’t use live fish, but we’ll be using frozen fish bought from a fishmonger. Any fish is possible to print, but those with scales and rugged fins print better.

It’s acceptable to add the eye afterwards, as the eye tends to become a black blob when rubbed. It’s also acceptable to add some hand colouring afterwards. There are no strict rules. You’re going to start with the basics of the tradition, but then progress to experiment and to add your own flair to your artworks.

Each attendee will be able to print at least two works.

What to bring? Please bring OLD CLOTHES; you WILL get dirty! The fish and the rest will be supplied.

Also bring your best smile and sense of adventure. This is going to be unforgettable.

Limited seats available, book now. Please make sure you make a separate booking for each person.

Museum Saturday GYOTAKU “FISH RUBBINGS” Kids Workshop
read more

Museum Saturday Prints by Nature Kids Workshop (Fully Booked)

Join us for a workshop (6-10yrs) with artist Fawa Conradie, inspired by the beauty the Museum Garden has on offer. You will be collecting an array of nature’s beauty from seeds to fallen leaves, in the attempt to create beautiful monoprints you can take home.
Attendance is free, all materials will be provided.

Limited seats available, book now.

Museum Saturday Prints by Nature Kids Workshop (Fully Booked)
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Museum Saturday Preserving Time in Honey, a take on Still Life (Fully Booked)

What makes honey so special, universally known as sweetener and medicine? Honey has been uncovered in tombs around the world, being thousands of years old, yet still perfectly preserved – a perfect time machine of the pollens and bees of that time and space. Join us for a workshop taking the still from life and creating new life with honey by learning easy fermentation techniques with
Zayaan Khan!

Booking is essential. Limited seats available.

Museum Saturday Preserving Time in Honey, a take on Still Life (Fully Booked)
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